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Would you describe an evolution in your work?

Adam Tickle
I think being in the design industry you never stop learning or discovering new things. I think my work evolves when my environment and the people I am with at the time evolve. It is important to surround yourself around like minded people and in interesting places.

Adrian Shaughnessy
The biggest evolution for me was shortly after I started my own design company (Intro). I had to stop being a working designer and become a creative director and business person. The studio grew very quickly and I found myself spending all day talking to clients, fighting with them, and hunting for new business. The only way that I could survive was to do less design and employ people to do it. I discovered that I derived a lot of pleasure from working with designers and helping them to develop and produce good work for the studio. My life became about the studio and not about my personal direction. It also taught me that design is collaborative.

Andrew Blauvelt
My work as a grad student at Cranbrook (mid to late 1980s) was steeped in visual complexities but in the mid-1990s I began to go back to an early period which was much more minimal and conceptual. That shift spawned the essay I wrote for eye mag. Entitled towards a complex simplicity around 2000 or 2001.

Dan McCarthy
There was a specific time where my work completely evolved and I looked at the world differently. I was taking an art class in Venice, Italy and each day the class would go out into the city and draw. I couldn’t bring myself to just draw your typical venetian landscape, so I looked to the rooftops and noticed the antennas. It blew my mind how I didn’t notice them before. They were so complicated and intricate and a lot of fun to draw. From then on, I always try to look for things that are typically overlooked or ignored in everyday landscapes.

Ed Fella
It was more of a de-evolution, from a slick commercial artist to a vernacular artist.

Eric Karjaluoto
I’ve actually thought a great deal about this recently. Initially I just wanted to reach a technical proficiency that would allow me to design visually appropriate work. From there I moved on to a state where I was really interested in the idea, and as such every project needed to have a great concept behind it. Both of those are still important; however, I now find myself most interested in the actual role of the project in a greater sense. The question I ask most these days is whether what we’re working on can somehow positively affect someone’s life.

Evan Leake
Not yet. I’ve only really been doing this about 4 years and I’m just getting started. I plan on keeping this job so hopefully I have more than a few decades left to work at it.

FACE
Yes, our work has become more intelligent. The more we mature our design the less graphics and BS we use.

Flip Flop Flyin
I think the whole project is an adventure and the pure essence continues to be evolved over time, project by project. We even learn more about the project as we put more time and energy into developing it. I think that as we grow ourselves, so does the work and the philosophy evolve into a better and more understandable solution that is more and more simple to relate to a greater audience. Its very exciting to see this happen to our work.

Friendswithyou
I think the whole project is an adventure and the pure essence continues to be evolved over time, project by project. We even learn more about the project as we put more time and energy into developing it. I think that as we grow ourselves, so does the work and the philosophy evolve into a better and more understandable solution that is more and more simple to relate to a greater audience. Its very exciting to see this happen to our work.

Friedrich-Wilhelm Graf
Working harder, getting stronger.

George Lois
I was at the top of my game in my mid-twenties, and I believe the power of my work remains constant at age77.

Hula Hula
I used to be a bit of a mess. With time I have learned to be more organized. My work has also grown to be fueled more by a concept than a particular style. Other than that I’d say I face the blank sheet -or white screen- with the same awe and eagerness to surprise and be surprised.

Ian Stevenson
When drawing, I enjoy trying something new and the next step is to do more animations and bring the drawings to life.

Jeff Domke
I wouldn’t describe an evolution in my work. I wouldn’t say that my work is any better today than it was 6 years ago. Reputations are silly. All that matters is the work on the wall today. Talking about good design is not the same as good design. Some days I put good work on the wall, and other days I put crap work on the wall.

Justin Ouellette
Not exactly. I was very interested in science and history. Later I realized that the things I loved learning about the most involved human communication and the nature of understanding. I see design and photography as a practical extension of that.

Lance Wyman
As an Industrial Design student at Pratt Institute I was selected by General Motors to participate in a summer design program. It took place between my junior and senior years and was a great experience. I met design students from across the country. One of them, a graphic design student from the graduate program at Yale, gave me my first glimpse of graphic design. I participated in the industrial and graphic design programs that summer, and was hired by General Motors as a graphic designer after graduation from Pratt. My work has evolved, based on these two disciplines, ever since.

Martin Anderson
Freedom and being much more relaxed and confident.

Milton Glaser
Over the past 50 years, my work has changed a lot.

Please Let Me Design
Our work is more “thinked” than before. We care less about the aesthetic and more about the idea.

Rick Valicenti
When i look and think back on my work, I see a reflection of my curiosities and life. It is a professional scrapbook.

Wolfgang Weingart
In a way, yes. Especially for people who hated typography before.

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Fill/Stroke is a collection of three individuals who have always been good at collecting content, but never really good at sharing it. We formed in early 2008, and have been honored to interview some of the greatest designers of our time.

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